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The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1929
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1929 - File 002. February 1929. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 18, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/14/show/11.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1929). The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1929 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/14/show/11

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1929 - File 002, February 1929, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 18, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/14/show/11.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 2, February 1929
Contributor
  • Kaplan, Isadore
Date February 1929
Language English
Description From masthead: "Published Monthly by Journalism Students. Official Publication of Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR (Etje (Eougar EDITORIAL STAFF Bmih Editor Isadora Kaplan Make-up Krtitor .Harry Spaman DEPARTM BNTAL EDITORS Humor Prai Literary Louise Husffins Society Dorothy li.iwnm:m Sports Robert Tracey Feature Writers Louis She|iper<l Frances Willard, C. It. Kawlinsoii Clubs Helen Cheney Faculty Advisor F. R. Birney REPORTERS John J'almer Catherine Fittger Mozart Hammond Celia Lesky I.tmni.- Lvoiis Francis Foster Bomelda Sass Bruce Manley Margaret Boyett Published Monthly by Journalism Students Ofi'kia' I'ublicatlon of i. Junior College Spirit It Is probably unnecessary to stress the fact that college spirit is lacking in Junior College. It seems tnat an Institution having an enrollment the size of ours would,snow some sparK of enthusiasm. The 'students should least support the few activities that are sponsored. ( College spirit is not built by the select few, and only by the cooperation, of everyone in general can it be accomplished. Or course every Individual must do his part, but it through a' united support that this soar Can be reached. Any school or college must have the true spirit to create a proper collegiate atmosphere. The students them selves must be sincere in their work. Not only in class work but every other activity attempted as a whole. One has only to attend a nigh school football game or social affair, and then it becomes obvious we have something to work for. It's true we're out of thi high school rank, but does this mean we've become blank, where any real enthusiasm is concerned? Frequent Quizzes Numerous quizzes are being given this week and next by many instructors at Junior College. Quizzes are not at all a new feature of this or any other educational institution, even if they were called tests before we reached college, but they are merely an unfortunate precedent followed especially by energetic instructors. The feeling of the students on this Issue is manifested in their wholehearted sympathy for the instructors ■who spend irksome hours grading badly written but fascinating papers. The producers of these papers—all geniuses—feel, however, that If they were allowed to take these examinations on typewriters they need waste no sympathy, because, in spite of the fact that the instructors have gone over he same material scores of times, the novel way in which they find it presented would afford no lack of entertainment. Students, being ambitious, will no doubt welcome all these quizzes, as student bodies are known to do the world over, and as a result the grades will undoubtedly range high. The pleased instructors will be inspired to continue the practice from now on. "What of It, we love it!" THINGS LITERARY Attention, Please! Last Wednesday night at 9 o'clock eight cars were parked in the driveway, with their rear wheels in the drive and the front wheels on the lawn of the campus in front of this building. San Jacinto High School is one of the most beautiful schools in the United States. Its picture appears in the civics textbooks used in Texas and other states, and is labeled as "a modern, beautiful high school." Junior college students should appreciate the geenrosity of the city school board in providing this building to house our classes. Appreciation could well be put into action on the part of all students and faculty members, by seeing to it that neither they nor others thoughtlessly drive cars across the lawn surrounding this building. You would not think of going downtown and instead of parking, turn your Ford or Cadillac directly across the sidewalk and park it headed into a bank or store building. Yet several persons each night drive or park (Continued on Page 4.) BY THE SEA By LOUISE HUGG1NS. Lorraine was a blond. She looked like almost any other attractive blond and acted every inch the same way. She had completed her freshman year at the University of Southern California, and, not having been a very dumb freshman, she was now far yond that stage. Her grades had been passing, though barely, but her family was greatly disappointed in her. They had expected so much she had made such remarkable grades before entering the university. (Families often forget the bad grades when relating the merits of their offsprings to others. And most of the time they have no way of knowing just how much of the work was done by some one else—friends of their darling). Lorraine was their darling and it was unfortunate that she did come up to their ideal of her. More unfortunate really that they should realize that she was not all they pected her to be. But they did not admit this even to themselves. It was this dear, devoted family of Lorraine's who was going to allow her to spend the summer in a beautiful little seacoast town between Los Angeles and San Diego. Lorraine was thinking sarcastically. She was curled up in a chair on the tiny, low porch of their coast cottage. They had^not come because Lorraine was on'the verge of a nervous breakdown, because she was nethusiastic about spending the summer near the water. The family had purchased the cottage because it was a pleasant way to spend a summer; several of their friends were doing it. Lorraine hated it. At home there was always something to do, and she had especially looked forward to this summer when she could go out as much as she wanted to with the people whom she had met at school (she lived in Los Angeles) without having her mother suggest that she study and rather maek a point of it. She had not minded coming, because there was always the chance that she would meet some attractive people— her mother had assured her of that. But they had been there two days and had done nothing but eat and sleep, and Lorraine's opes were exhausted. And to think of spending two months and twenty days in this place was unendurable! Jerry was back in Los Angeles, working Lorraine supposed, and she hoped he was thinking ahotu her at that minute. It would have been grand to see him right then. Sometimes she did not even want to Bee him, but at other times she felt as If she would die If she did not see him within the next thirty minutes. She hoped he would write to her as he had promised. She wondered how many dates he would.have and with whom, and perhaps he would come down to see her. Lorraine was not really in love. Most of the times when she felt that her end was near if he did not appear, he actually did not come and she kept right on living. Not only that—if someone else did come Instead of Jerry she liked it just as well. But no one could have convinced her that she was not In love— no one even tried. But to be on the safe side the family had decided definitely to leave town for the summer, and for reasons already given they chose the coast. Needless to state, they did not like Jerry. Details are unnecessary. Chiefly they thought Lorraine was too young to even think of getting married, but if she had not thought of it they would not have considered her serious enough. Before this, our little heroine had always liked the water. She remembered that the summer before she had had marvelous times at the beach swimming, but there had always been a huge crowd of them, and after swimming they always spent hours lying around on the sand eating hot- dogs, popcorn and lots of other messy things. All that was before she went to the university, and before she knew Jerry. Happiness now would consist of being as far out as she could see In the water in a boat with Jerry. Several boats were in sight. Lorraine's mascaro framed eyes almost pleaded one of them to land near to where she was. But it was no Jse. The oceau liners sailed unconcernedly on, and Lorraine listlessly pushed her short curly hair behind her small ears. Chug, chug, chug_ came In rapid succession and Lorraine looked around, A huge yacht was plowing along. It came closer and closer until it almost reached the shore and then the power was cut off. It was soon anchored and people began climbing ashore. Near Lorraine's cottage were many other cottages, but about the distance of two blocks away there was a large two-story frame house. All the people on the boat walked on the pier and on farther up a small hill to the big house. If only someone had asked her to party like that! For one whole day she hardly left her front porch, she was so busily engaged in watching all she could of the house party. They swam, sailed, and fished, all one day. The next day Lorraine was desperate; so she persuaded her mother to go swimming with her when she saw some of the others in. She swam as far down as they were, but when she discovered how far she had gone, she was ostensibly embarrassed and attempted to swim back hurriedly. She quite tired by this time and decided to float until more rested. The current soon carried her away out. Her mother screamed for her to come back, but she did not hear. Finally her mother became panicky. Several of the party realized her distress and two boys swam to where Lorraine was. She was very surprised to see them but not displeased. They swam back together and Lorraine met the hostess who invited her to join thein that night at a marshmallow roast. One of her rescuers asked to come and get her. She hesitatingly accepted. That night was beautiful. The moon was almost full, the fog over the murmuring waves met the clouds through which a few stars twinkled. Lorraine was so excited that she forgot to think about Jerry, and she almost squealed with delight on the way to the party. They had chosen a neighboring hill on which to roast the marshmallows and it was there that Lorraine and her escort went. The hostess came forard to meet her. and after they greeted each other the former, whose name was Gladys, began introducing Lorraine. Suddenly Jerry stepped up: "Why. Lorraine, how did you get here?" "Well, Jerry—" stammtred Lorr- raine. "Is your house near here?" asked the surprised Jerry. "Then came the dawn," nodded Lorraine. "I didn't know it." "What if you had?" accused Lorraine. "Well, I might—" But Lorraine heard no more; she had consuered that little hurt feeling had gained her self possession and begged her hostess to go on with the Introductions. She heard no^names however, and only answered mechanically. She could not forget the fact that Jerry had bfeen having such a good time, when he had told her he did not see how he could stand it with her away. She knew she should not have believed him, but she had wanted to so much. She knew that she should not mind his being here; that she should be glad, but sowehow she couldn't. Continue this thrilling romance In next issue of The Cougar. COLLEGE GIRLS' VOCABULARY By FRANCES WILLARD. The influence of environment seems to leave nothing untouched; it sets the direction not only of one's thoughts and habits of life, but determines in large measure one's manner of speech. Girls that spend several consecutive years In college become so accustomed to surrounding conditions that unconsciously they develop a vocabulary typically different from other peeple. To a person who has been awaly from college for some time or who r)as never been, this difference is deciiedly noticeable. It is not a question of slang as ie might hastily fuggest, but simply of the abuse or misapplication of perfectly good, legitimate words. In our language, as in many other things American, the prevailing character is extravagance. . Any adjective thai makes the trifles of conversation appear interesting or exciting is not only permissible, but imperative. The most commonplace remark is splashed with the high color of adventure; and an incident is scarcely worth listening to if it is not "the most exciting thing you ever heard in your life"— the last three words uttered with an inflection gradually rising to a shriek on life. Naturally, the speaker "nearly died" under the stress of it all. "Exciting" and "killing," however, are mild descriptives. To obtain a ready listener, events must be "thrilling." Girls are "thrilled" at seeing each other after a short absence; they are "thrilled" at the idea of a eut; and, above all things, they are "thrilled" at the appearance of a new boy on the campus. To keep up this existence of thrills for several years must be very hard on the system. This life surely requires strong nerves! "Weirdf" and "ghastly" both are words often dragged from their proper surroundings into broad daylight, but, fortunately, ont as yet with such frequency and boldness as the word "wonderful." This adjective is perhaps the most abused in the college vocabulary. Of course when one thinks about it, everything in the universe is wonderful; nevertheless, some things are incomparably more amazing than others, and if we describe mere nothings as "wonderful" how can we express the really vital somethings? Twenty times a day we hear, "Oh, we had the most wonderful time at the dance last night," and "really, it was perfectly wonderful gin." Surrounded by such intemperate absurdities, is it strange that any attempt to adequately express genuine wonder is almost hopeless? It is as baffling as to try drawing music from a useless wornout Instrument. Society A dance, sponsored by the sopho more class, will be given on March 1. This annual affair will be held in the gym for Junior College students only. Come at 9 and dance to the enchanting strains of Mart Britt and his "Victor recording artists. Mrs. A. H. Fergerson entertained Thursday night with a dinner dance to compliment her niece, Miss Alleen Pickett. Miss Pickett is as tudent of the Junior College and several of her girl friends remained with her for the night. Miss Katherine Kiley entertained with a buffet luncheon at her home on Richmond avenue Wednesday, in honor of her visitor, Miss Joan Mitchell of New Yrk. Miss Kiley used carnatins in develping her decrative scheme with appintments in harmony. She was assisted by her mother. Largest of the social events of the Junior College will be a dance given on March 15 at Kensington Hall. Many plans are being made and it is expected to be a big success. Music will be furnished by Earl McMahon. Miss Frances Boyles will entertain on Tuesday, February 19, with an informal coffee to compliment her house guest, Miss Henrietta Hartman. Miss Jane E. Smlthey, a graduate of Central High School and last year freshman in the college, was recently married to Mr. Ralph W. Nikon of Austin, Texas. iss Minetta G. Littleton missed classes and some monthly tests just before the Christmas holidays. Now comes the news that she has married. A new and good excuse for missing classes. The members of the course of the history of Chinese art and culture were recently entertained at the residence of Prof, and Mrs. Wallace H. Miner with "an evening of things Chinese' much to their enjoyment and that of their friends. R. Rainbolt—"What makes you hold me so tight?" A. Lee—"I work in a glue factory." | Clubs DRAMATIC CLUB. The John K. Bender Dramatic club has been devoting most of its attention to the production of the play, "Who*B to Win Him'."' which was presented in the assembly on February 6. The students taking part in the play were: Garland Sadler, Bryan Sadler, Robert Cole, Bernice Newton, Faye Ledlow, Opal Beane, Dorothy Dixon and Aileen Pickett. The staging of this play was under the direction of Mrs. Lilian Blocker. The club is planning to present a two or three act play in April. Officers of the club are: Garland Sadler, president; Richard Speed, vice president; Bernice Newton, secretary- treasurer.- All students interested in dramatics are invited to join the club at its next regulaj meeting. GLEE CLUB. The Glee club has been enjoying the whole hearted co-operation of a number of very enthusiastic students. All music has been purchased from a fund derived from payment of dues and there is still an item of "cash on hand" on the balance sheet with no bills outstanding. The first official appearance of the body was made in assembly some time ago, ■ and the second program was presented on the last school Thursday before Christmas, At that time a selection of Christmas carols was well received. A short skit, "Skip a Class," was advertised for February 20. The scene of the action is laid in any room that contains a piano. ' The time Is any class hour between 4 and 9 p. m. The "personnel is any group of students, represented by the members of the Glee Club. GLEE CLUB. A musical comedy? And how! Have you read "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight?" No? Then we commend you affectionately to the appendix of a Book of English Literature. The play will be modern in all respects—dress, mode of speech, and manner of presentation, but it will remain faithful to the theme of the Arthurian legand. Watch for further announcement as to the date and place. Y. W. C. A. CLUB. On February 6 a Y. W. C. A. club was organized at Houston Junior College with the assistance of Mrs. Bender and Mrs. Soule. At this meeting the following officers were elected: Janeva Jacobs, prsident; Mary Louise Tomsen, vice president; Ma- ruerite Kennedy, secretary-treasurer. The one object of this club is to bring the girls of Houston Junior College into a closer fellowship. The college Y. W. C. A. is a separate organization from the "uptown" Y. W. C. A. and it is so organized that it can be representative of the entire school. Miss Hilda K. Howard, who is Southwest district representative for the college Y ,W. C. A., will be in Houston about the 15th of March to aid in a better organization. The program for the spring session is going to be on the subject of "Customs in Foreign Countries." Besides this educational program there to be a number of social events, first being a "Big Sister-Little Sister" party oh March 2. This party is for all Houston Junior College girls, and it has been so arranged that the upper class girls will escort the freshman girls to the party. The club Is holding its meetings every Wednesday at 3:15 p. m. in room 106. All girls interested are invited to come to these meetings. "Masculinity covereth a multitude of sins." "It a man would stick to his wife like he sticks to his seat in the street car, there wouldn't be much need for an alimony bureau." "Faint praise ne'er won fair lady." Murray—"Didja ever see a horse with a wooden leg?" Canatella—"No, did you?" Murray—"Sure!" Canatella—"Where?" Murray—"On a merry-go-round."
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