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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931 - File 001. May 27, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/134/show/130.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 27, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/134/show/130

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931 - File 001, May 27, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/134/show/130.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 12, May, 27, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 12, May 27, 1931
Contributor
  • Kendall, Everett
Date May 27, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript J. C. Grads Goodbye Good Luck THE COUGAR Published by the Journalism Students of the Houston Junior College Remember Summer School June First HOUSTON, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, MAY 27, 1931 SCHOOL OFFERS EDUCATION IN SUMMER SESSION Twenty-five Freshmen Courses And Fourteen Sophomore Subjects Planned The fact that the Houston Junior College offers the professional training necessary to the prospective teacher has proven a boon, not only to those just beginning their college work but also to those who are graduates of colleges and unoversities that give no education courses. "'The teacher training courses are to the students of education what the in'terneship is to the medical student," stated Mr. Henderson. The importance of the Education Department of H. J. C. can not be doubted when we find that over half of the work is being taken.by advanced and post-graduate students. Mr. Henderson states that he has in his classes those who hold degrees from Rice Institute, University of Texas, and one from Wellesly College. Especially during the summer term many teachers from the surrounding country come in to complete their educational work. Houston Junior College is prepared (Continued on page 3) HARPISTS ENTERTAIN STUDENTS IN CHAPEL The student body was entertained Wednesday evening, May 13, during general assembdw, by guest artists from Miss Mildred Milligan's studio. One of the features of the evening was the solo number played by Miss Arabelle Rodgers. Accompanying Miss; Rodgers were the talented young harpists, Misses Pauline Leschenger, Imo- gene Kingbach, Patricia Johns and Edith Edgar, pianist. The student body received the selections with much applause and highly appreciated the half hour entertainment. The entertainment was directed by Carl D. La Firney, also a student from the Milligan Studio and a fellow student of the Houston Junior College. COUGAR ATHLETES AWARDED LETTERS Thirteen letters in footfall, seven in boys' basketball, and seven in girls' basketball, are the most tangible proofs of sport activities of 1930-31 at H. J. C. Every team has been handicapped by conflicting classes and hours ofj labor. The football team met these difficulties by installing floodlights and practicing late at night, after school was out. Later, the two basketball teams practiced when they could. Attempts were made early in the spring to organize a baseball team, but it was impossible to have proper practice sessions. It was the same with the track team. The girls, on their own hook, staged a tennis tournament. Letterment of the football and basketball teams received souvenir trophies. Coach A. W. French, Miss Dorothy Mackey, and Assistant Coach A. B. Pease, who is now at Washington Junior High School, have directed sport activities throughout the year. EDUCATION CUSSES PRESENT CLEVER SKIT Presenting a contrast between he old method of teaching school and the new, or socialized system of presenting a lesson to a class, A. L. Kerbow's education classes, 113 and 123, entertained students and vistors in the auditorium on Friday evening, May 15. Two scenes were enacted, the old style school teacher drilling her pupils, presented by the 123 class, and the more modern method presented by the 113 class. Mrs. E. W. Sturdivant. as the old fashioned school marm, belayed her unfortunate pupils both verbally and physically. Addison West- meyer as teacher's pet, and Mac Daugherty as a bad boy, were the foremost characters. Elizabeth B. Kerbow, as a modern teacher presenting a lesson in an interesting manner, allowed her class to set out the story of Pochahontas and Captain John Smith. Katherine Elliot, as "Pokey Huntus;" Paul Guilder, as "Chief Powder Can;" and Wesley Rees, as Captain John Smith were the Other members of the cast were: Lily Albers, Janice Berry, Nancy Bringhurst, Berta Estes Virginia Lee Funke, Melanee E. Garrett, Ray Larue Hourneay, Josephine Liestman, Mrs. C. Lewis, Margaret Mounger, Elizabeth Overton, Mrs. Grace Riley, Margaret Shell, Marjorie Sims, Elizabeth Sin- clare, Marie Starr up, Betty Tinsley, Margaret Ann Toler, Mrs. H. W. Ash- worth, Delores Bonneau, Bernice Bra- num, James C. Brough, Fritz A. Busch, Sammie Lane Fowler, A. C. Irwin, Lucy Kelley, Amelia Keptra, Ora Morgan, J. B. Parr, Rosa Schultz, and Mildred Wroten. Language Students Tell Spanish Legends Spanish legends told in the beautiful language of Spain—at least that was the intention—have enlivened Miss Undine Stockard's beginning Spanish classes. As a section of the "final" for this class, the members told legends from old Spain in the original language. Although no Spanish people were present, the class members feel sure that the program would have been enjoyed by Spanish speaking people if they could have attended, and have understood the efforts. STUDENT IN "BIG BUSINESS" A. P. Riley, 12, is in the airplane business. You may have noticed him loitering in the halls of the college and in front of the building, continually demonstrating his wares, and persistently cajoling some H. J. C. student into "trying one of them out." "They buy the ten cent ones pretty good," stated the airplane sales agent, "but the seventy-five cent ones with the propellers don't go so good. They break more of them trying them out and have to pay for them than they really buy." "Willard Nesmith bought three of the ten cent ones," he further announced. Wisdom is to the mind what health is to the body. Training is everything. The peach was once a bitter almond; cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a collegt education.—Puddenhead Wilson's Calendar. Cougar Congratulates High School Graduates Senior high school graduates— this issue of the Houston Junior College Cougar is dedicated to you. We present to you herewith a brief glimpse of our school and its activities in the classroom and on the ■ athletic field, and also( some of the social diversions we( enjoy. Furthermore, we call your attention to the pictures of some of our popular instructors who have labored to make our If you choose te cast your lot with us next year, we, the editorial board, feel s;ure you will, find the time spent at H. J. C, interesting, profitable, and enjoyable. But whether or not you gain a closer acquaintance with the H. J. C, The Cougar takes this opportunity to congratulate you on, your having graduated from Texas' wonderful high schools, and wish you all the happiness and success in the world. LIBRARY GETS FAMOUS BOOK Mr. T. H. Mattingly has presented the Houston Junior College Library with its second copy of "Jeb Stuart," Captain John Thomason's new book. Miss Sue Thomason gave the library its first copy of this interesting book. FRED R. BIRNEY President of Houston Board of Edu- PROFESSOR GIVES ENGINEERING FACTS "Please stress the fact that none of these courses is prerequisite for any, other course," Professor J. A. Herrington asked of a Cougar reporter when interviewed for a story on his engineering department. The courses referred to were Engineering Drawing 113, Descriptive Geometry 123, Pure Kinematics 213, and, Constructive Kinematics 223. "This is merely the recommended order," continued Professor Herrington. "Many of the students have the mistaken idea that this is the required Professor Herrington is in charge of the department. In addition, Professor Stuart Mackay teaches half of the. freshman class. There are 50 students, enrolled in Engineering Drawing 113, while only seven are enrolled in Pure| Kinematics 213. "Most of these students are preparing (Continued on page 3) PROGRAM GIVEN FOR CLASS OF 1931 GRADUATES Largest Class To Leave H. J. C. Will Attend Party at Casa Del Mar Special recognition was tendered the graduating class of H. J. C, Wednesday, May 20, when N. K. Dupre, assistant dean, turned the weekly assembly over to them. M. A. Miller, the speaker of the evening, was introduced by Harold Woods, class president. Mr. Woods expressed briefly the common reluctance of the class to leave the college and its instructors whose environment and training they considered invaluable. "This is not a farewell address," began Mr. Miller, "because we do not believe in farewells. I shall bring to you a few remarks on the outstanding aspects of life, among which are: prevision, reality of life, skill or ability, to take advantage of our 'lucky breaks,* and the value of an education." "What else is there for man to learn?" was the impulsive inquiry of a sophomore student to which Mr. Miller responded that the little which is known to man makes a very slight impression befoi* that vast unknown that is yet to be discovered. (Continued on page 3) RECEPTION HELD FOR HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS Wilma Lindsay of Sam Houston High School was chosen the most beautiful high school graduate in Houston, at the fourth annual reception held by the Houston Junior College for city high school graduates Friday night, May 8, at the San Jacinto High School gymnasium. More than 1000 high school senior and junior college students attended the reception. The high light of the program was the beauty parade, in which the most beautiful and the most popular girl from each of the five schools and the Junior College marched. They were presented by Warrent Lemmon, preside nfl of the freshman class, and S. W. Garrison, president of the Students Association. This took place amid tall baskets of flowers in front of a wisteria trimmed trellis. The gymnasium (Continued on page 3) H.J.C. PUCES SECOND IN ORATORICAL CONTEST Dramatics and oratory have had a flourishing season at Houston Junior College this year. Much prospective material has been discovered that will be to the advantage of the school during the next season. The boys have held debates with Tehacana and Beaumont. The girls, have had two debates with Temple. In the oratorical contests Joe Ed Winfree and Christine Fitzgerald upheld the honor of the school by taking second place at Westminster Junior] College. The John R. Bender Dramatic Society has given two very successful plays which won favorable comments from the student body and the faculty. "Nothing But the Truth" was presented here and was so much enjoyed that it was later represented at Richmond. "The Immigrant," a one-act play writ-! ten by a Houston Junior College student, was presented here following the annual reception for high school seniors. The cast for the latter play was chosen at random from the student body. MANY WORKERS IN J. C. STUDENT BODY Soda jerkers, statisticians, milkmen, file clerks, brokers, "pump monkeys," newspaper men, engravers, secretaries, P.B.X. operators, stenographers, clerks, teachers, all may be found at H. J. C. Yes, and ice men, too. According to Mr. Dupre, assistant dean of H. J. C, the greater work of this college is the offering of two years of college work equivalent to that of any other university or collegetn Texas, to these boys, girls, men, and women who work. The general character of H. J. C. students is well showrr by the remark of A. Leon, H. J. C. janitor, who stated: (Continued on page 3) 1931 CLASS LARGEST IN SCHOOL'S HISTORY As the end of school draws near, 51 Junior College students find themselves in the midst of senior activities and functions. The graduation class of 1931 is the largest outgoing class since the school came into existence four years ago. This week in particular is an outstanding week for the graduates. Sunday night the baccalaureate sermon was delivered to the Junior College and high school seniors at Buffalo Stadium. One of the most beautiful ceremonies ever to be attended by a large number of Houstonians. The address was delivered by Dr. E. P. West. Tuesday night the Junior College seniors again assembled at Buffalo Stadium to attend the annual commencement exercise. Mr. John J. Tigert of tbe University of Florida delivered the commencement address. Thursday, May 28, the first annual senior picnic will be staged at Casa Del Mar, the Y. W. C. A. home at Morgan's Point. A large number of the graduates and their friends are expected to be present. Wisdom is knowing what to do next. Skill is knowing how to do it, and virtue is doing it—Jordan.
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