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The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929
File 001
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The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929 - File 001. April 1929. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 18, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/109/show/105.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 1929). The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/109/show/105

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929 - File 001, April 1929, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 18, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/109/show/105.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1929
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. II, No. 4, April 1929
Contributor
  • Shepperd, Louise
Date April 1929
Language English
Description From masthead: "Published Monthly by Journalism Students. Official Publication of Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ENROLLMENT DATES SUMMER TERM: MAY 31, JUNE 1 4.3 FALL TERM: SEPT. 11 & 16 THE COUGAR Published by the Journalism Students of the Houston Junior College ENROLL NOW SUMMER TERM HOUSTON JUNIOR TON. TEXAS. APRIL, 1929 STATE RECOGNIZES WORK COMPLETED AT THE JUNIOR COLLEGE Issuance of Teachers' Certificates Made Possible by State Affiliation Affiliation given Houston Junior College by the State Department of Education enables students wishing to teach to secure certificates upou the completion of certain required courses at Junior College. A student who completes the first year's work, or five full courses, will receive from the Slate Department of Education an elementary certificate of the first class, valid for four years, or a high school certificate of the first class valid for two yeara. The five courses must include one course in education, one in English, and three semester hours in government. Not more than two coursea may be taken in any one subject, and all five must be those which the college recognizes as giving credit towards a degree. A student who completes both years' work, or ten full courses, will receive an elementary certificate of first class valid for six years, provided the courses include those required for the first year certificate and two in professional training. A high school certificate of the first class, valid for four years, will be issued upon the completion of ten full courses, including those required for the first year certificate, and two courses in education, one of which shall bear npon training for high school leaching. All work of the college which is counted toward a degree is accepted by the State Board of Education at its face value. The State Board of Examiners, a department of the Stacc Board of Education, sent a representative here last year to examine the work offered by the Junior College. This representative reported very la- vorably on the college and full affiliation in both years' work was given. The affiliation was effective last year and between 20 and 30 certifl- (Continued on page 3) President, Houston Publ NEW CERTIFICATE LAW IS HELP TO TEACHERS DR. £. E. OBERHOLTZER By Louise Shepperd Teachers whose certificates will expire this coming August will be especially interested in the certificate extension act passed by the last legislature. Under the provision of this d: "icse teachers can attend the six wt summer session legi mplete six semestt work, 1 have their certifica... tended for one year. This announcement was made in a letter dated March 30, 1929, from Mr. J. R. Reed, chairman of the board of examiners of the State Department of Education to the registrar. An excerpt from this letter follows: "The Forty-fifth legislature passed a law which, because of the emergency clause it carries, is now in effect. This law amended an act of the Fortieth legislature, providing for the renewal or exiension of teachers' certificates. "Under the amended law, only six semester hours of college work will now be required to extend a certificate for one year. Moreover, certificates may now be renewed perpetually, which is to say that certificates renewed in the summer of 192S and which expire in the summer of 1929 may again be renewed. "Institutions may now offer teachers sufficient work for the renewal of a certificate in six weeks without violating the standard student load for colleges." STATUS OF JUNIOR COLLEGE IMPORTANT Oberholtzer Stresses Advantages Offered by Institution "The Junior College is to the present age what the Senior High School three decades ago," stated Dr. E. Oberholtzer, superintendent of Houston Public Schools, and president of (lie Houston Junior College, in a recent interview. "It is a most valuable institution. Today tffe Junior Col'ege extends Hit educational training period two years for those that feel the need. It is an opportunity for those who cannot afford to attend the Senior Colleges. Dua to night sessions, one may support his family by day and also receive that necessary culture, education. The Junior College offers the best opportunity for one to two y courses in vocational training and for approach to professional training. Trades and industries require wider knowledge of planning and designing and interpretation of plans and signs. In addition the training in skill will change the journeyman to the Preparation to live fully is more necessary now than ever before. Broader education makes possible travel and the radio. Indeed, college education is one of society's requirements. Communities are having to provide for those who have finished senior high school. "Many have asked of me, how the Junior College of Houston originated." Dr. Oberholtzer declared. "Many complaints were given me regarding the 'Continued on page 3) MUNICIPAL COLLEGE SHOWS PROGRESS IN EDUCATIONAL FIELD History of Houston Junior College Replete With Scholastic Achievement The Houston Junior College was established by the Board of Education in the spring of 1927 after conferences th representatives from the State Department of Education, University of Texas, Rice Institute, and Sam Houston State Teachers College. The College opened with a summer ission June 5, 1927, in the San Jacinto Senior High School building th a faculty largely recruited from the staffs of the University of Texas an<i Sam Houston State Teachers College. Two hundred thirty-two sti* dents were enrolled for this session and courses were offered in Education, Spanish, English, History, Biology, Art, and Physical Education. ' The first regular session of the college opened September 19, 1927 with staff and faculty of twenty-one. Dur- g this session, four hundred sixty students were enrolled. The faculty organized with a view to teaching ability, as well as academic trailing. Full freshman and sophomore work .vas offered, special provisions being nade for groups preparing for professional courses in medicine, engineering, dentistry, and law. In addition to the splendid library of San Jacinto High School, over two thousand volumes, purchased by the co'lege. were available to the student body. During the first year, the work be- :ng clanj here :vl t!-c jr;;:ipm T.t of the Junior College were rigidly in spected by the State Department of Education and the College was fully recognized as a Junior College of the first class, and under the law, el titled to full certificate privilege; (Continued on page 3) NEW COURSE ON LIST OF TEACHING REQUIREMENT Of especial interest to prospecti teachers is an ait included in the laws passed by the last legislature. This act provides that students wishing certificates hereafter must include in the required courses three semester hours of government, deal ing with the government of the Unit ed States. Government 223, offered by the Houston Junior College, will satisfy this requirement and will be offered during the summer term. Those who have not taken a course in government and who wish to receive certificates at the end of the summer term, should include this course in ,ummer. MR. F. M. BLACK n, Houston Junior College, and Director of High Schools, Houston Public Schools ANNOUNCEMENT OF SUMMER COURSES Dean Black Anticipates Larger Enrollment for Summer Courses of instruction to be offered in the Houston Junior College summer session, beginning Monday, June 3, and continuing for six weeks, until July 12, have been announced by Dean F. M. Black. According to present indications, officials expect that this year's enrollment will exceed that of the past two years, and are planning to offer any course for which sufficient students enroll to justify a class. Freshman classes are already planned in the following subjects: English, mathematics, public school music, physical education, biology, history, Spanish, education, public school art, chemistry and physics. Sophomore classes already scheduled for the summer session include history, education, Spanish, public school art, public school music, economics, biology, English and demonstration classes in education. Teachers in the local schools and in small city and rural schools in the Southeastern district of the state have already made many inquiries concerning the third summer session of the Junior College. Students now attending other institutions are also interested in the courses to be offered, since many of these students will at tend classes while home for the mer vacation. In all cases where courses of instruction are desired. Junior College authorities will endeavor (Continued on page 3) SCHOLASTIC RATING OF JUNIOR COLLEGE ABOVE THE AVERAGE Texas Association of Colleges Gives Full Certificate Privileges for Work Done One of the biggest drawing cards at the Houston Junior College is the fact that it offers to the young men and women of Houston and nearby towns, prerequisite courses in maladministration, journalism, English, nursing, medicine, law, education, home economics, engineering, and physical education. During its first year, the equipment and work being done were rigidly inspected by the State Department of Education and the college was fully recognized as a junior college of the first class and, under the law, entitled to full certificate privileges. Later iu the year, the college was again inspected by the representatives of the Texas Association of CollegeB and, at the meeting of the Association in the spring, the college was recog;- nized as a class A junior college with reservations whatever. This action means that the work done at the Houston Junior College •ansferable at face value to all other Texas colleges and that students from Houston and this section of Texas can do two full years of standard college work at home, which can be transferred without loss to all the colleges having membership in the Texas Association of Colleges. It is the purpose of the Junior College to make available to many who might not otherwise have the advantages of college training. Two years of high-grade standard college work, and. in short, to assure every student prerequisite work in almost everj standard professional course. This means a great deal to the enthusiastic young man who has chosen to tafte law, medicine, journalism, or even physical training as a life-time pro- fi-ssion. Instead of wasting two years because lie is unable to attend an out-of-town college, this same student can take the necessary two years of. training at home and, if necessary, can hold a business position in a n town office to pay for his night classes and his living expenses while attending Junior College, as many other students are doing at the present time. LOAN FUND BENEFITS MANY NEEDY STUDENTS Eight Students Aided by P.-T. A^ Fund for Junior College Students. Eight students have benefited Dy the Central Council of P.-T. A. Loan- Fund for Junior College students. Although a high school fund has been available for many years, money for the use of Junior College students was financed last year through ther P.-T. A. sponsoring a sale of pictures.- To the original sum of $1500, the Dramatic Club of Junior College added the proceeds from a repeat performance of a play. No interest accrues on the loan until a student has completed his schooling. Then 4 per cent Interest is charged until the debt Is paid. The Central Council of P.- T. A, handles the fund. Officers of the committee are: Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, president: Mrs. John R. Bender, secretary, and R J. Slagle, treasurer. An additional sum will be added to the fund this year by the P.-T. A. following the picture sale this spring. JOHN H. REAGAN HIGH SCHOOL S. P. Walthrop, Principal "The Junior College fills a gap between Senior High Schools and Standard Universities. It serves as a curing period for immaturity. It is a very- valuable asset to the educational world."
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